cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
In which I demonstrate that three different tutorials for the same historical garment--the Skjoldehamn hood--result in hoods that are subtly but noticeably different in appearance and design. Go here for the entry.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
In which I talk about a book of essays about foreign influences upon historical textiles and clothing. It's much more interesting that than description indicates. Go here for the entry.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
In which I talk about a competitor to Soylent, a "nutritionally complete" food. Go here for the entry.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
This post contains links to good sites for finding resources for more intense, complex projects than "one afternoon" tutorials. Go here for the entry.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
In which I highlight for my readers an article about food in ancient Israel. A lot of what they ate, according to Professor Cynthia Shafer-Elliott, was--stew. They weren't the only ones to do so, as I point out. If this sounds interesting to you, go here for the entry.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
The post is exactly described by the title. Go here for the entry.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
In which I discuss, at some length, textile fragments believed to have come from a Viking woman's garment and four different attempts to reconstruct the garment with one of the few features of the garment evidenced by the surviving fabric scraps--a pleated section probably located between the breasts. Go here for the entry, if you care about such things.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
In which I write about a YouTube video that describes the making of a reconstruction of a 1700 year old tunic, found in the wake of a melting glacier. Helpfully, the tunic was intact, just like the Hammerum dress I discussed a few months ago. Go here for the entry.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
In which I rattle on about a new archaeological analysis that tends to confirm that at least some Viking women were fighters. No, really. Go here for the entry.
cathyr19355: Stock photo of myself (Default)
In which it give links to the blog of two German scholars who made their own reconstructions of the apron dress worn to the grave by the "Woman in Blue." They explain in detail the reasons for their decisions, especially when those decisions resulted in a lower level of authenticity of the finished product. Go here for the entry.

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